Bevölkerungswachstum

Population growth by country

Global population growth is the result of birth rate and death rate. The world population is rising steadily. In 2016, it reached a total population of 7.442 billion people on our planet with a growth rate of 1.2%.

With a growth rate of about 0.8% in the last decade, the United States are well in the middle of the global comparison. The last slight increase of it's growth rate was in 90s.

By contrast, the states of Qatar and the United Arab Emirates (both located in Western Asia) are by far the leaders in recent decades. Growth rates of more than 15% per year were achieved there.

Population growth 2007 - 2016

+9% or more
0% or less


Other periods:1960 - 20162007 - 20161997 - 20061987 - 19961977 - 1986

CountryØ Growth/yearGrowth 2007-2016
Qatar9.89%116.02%
United Arab Emirates6.00%53.37%
Oman5.54%66.17%
Kuwait5.48%61.88%
Jordan4.77%52.68%
Equatorial Guinea4.43%47.29%
Bahrain4.07%37.58%
Lebanon4.03%46.99%
Niger3.88%40.94%
South Sudan3.75%38.09%
Angola3.58%37.22%
Uganda3.45%35.62%
Democratic Republic of the Congo3.37%34.78%
Chad3.32%34.12%
Burundi3.21%32.55%
Gabon3.20%32.94%
Tanzania3.18%32.56%
Gambia3.18%32.45%
Liberia3.18%31.34%
Mali3.13%31.58%
Burkina Faso3.03%30.83%
Malawi3.02%30.71%
Iraq2.99%31.04%
Zambia2.97%30.37%
Afghanistan2.96%30.20%
Mozambique2.95%29.93%
Palestine2.94%30.25%
Somalia2.94%29.71%
Mauritania2.93%29.84%
Republic of the Congo2.92%28.91%
Senegal2.92%29.80%
Benin2.84%28.59%
Madagascar2.80%28.10%
Saudi Arabia2.76%27.81%
Cameroon2.73%27.42%
Kenya2.72%27.24%
Nigeria2.69%27.03%
Yemen2.69%26.81%
Togo2.68%26.83%
Ethiopia2.65%26.42%
Nauru2.64%29.52%
Rwanda2.61%26.15%
Guinea-Bissau2.54%25.57%
British Virgin Islands2.52%23.98%
Ghana2.46%24.26%
Singapore2.46%22.20%
Macau2.18%21.50%
Luxembourg2.12%21.45%
Pakistan2.09%20.50%
Egypt2.04%20.31%
Israel1.94%19.04%
Algeria1.86%18.38%
Malaysia1.78%17.13%
Philippines1.64%15.71%
Bolivia1.61%15.32%
Australia1.55%15.84%
Kazakhstan1.52%14.94%
South Africa1.49%14.37%
Venezuela1.49%14.00%
Mexico1.48%14.04%
Turkey1.46%14.25%
Morocco1.34%12.97%
India1.32%12.25%
Peru1.29%12.30%
Indonesia1.28%12.07%
Costa Rica1.21%11.16%
Iran1.20%11.45%
Norway1.16%11.12%
New Zealand1.15%11.10%
Bangladesh1.15%10.75%
Monaco1.13%9.65%
Switzerland1.13%10.87%
Ireland1.12%8.51%
Nepal1.12%10.56%
Canada1.09%10.33%
Vietnam1.07%10.07%
Colombia1.05%9.64%
Argentina1.03%9.70%
Iceland0.96%7.28%
Brazil0.95%8.70%
Chile0.93%8.60%
Sweden0.87%8.25%
Sri Lanka0.83%7.80%
United States0.80%7.27%
United Kingdom0.76%7.04%
Belgium0.73%6.80%
Liechtenstein0.71%6.64%
Hong Kong0.69%6.22%
Austria0.57%5.45%
South Korea0.57%5.26%
Kosovo0.55%4.78%
North Korea0.53%4.81%
Denmark0.53%4.94%
China0.50%4.61%
France0.50%4.50%
Spain0.45%2.69%
Thailand0.45%4.03%
Finland0.43%3.90%
Italy0.42%3.70%
Netherlands0.40%3.89%
Aruba0.39%3.56%
Grenada0.39%3.60%
Dominica0.38%3.65%
Barbados0.36%3.20%
Uruguay0.33%3.12%
Guyana0.31%3.40%
Czech Republic0.31%2.55%
Slovenia0.29%2.32%
Guam0.26%2.54%
Mauritius0.24%1.92%
Marshall Islands0.19%1.78%
Cuba0.16%1.52%
Faroe Islands0.15%1.38%
Bermuda0.13%0.68%
Montenegro0.13%1.12%
Slovakia0.10%1.01%
Russia0.09%1.08%
Macedonia0.09%0.76%
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines0.07%0.55%
Germany0.04%0.49%
Poland-0.05%-0.45%
Japan-0.07%-0.79%
Micronesia, Federated States of-0.07%-0.13%
Moldova-0.09%-0.70%
Belarus-0.10%-0.56%
Greenland-0.10%-0.65%
Armenia-0.11%-0.28%
Portugal-0.19%-2.07%
Estonia-0.23%-1.80%
Syria-0.23%-6.12%
Greece-0.25%-2.73%
Hungary-0.25%-2.37%
Ukraine-0.39%-3.24%
Albania-0.40%-3.16%
Virgin Islands-0.45%-4.16%
Andorra-0.46%-6.53%
Serbia-0.49%-4.39%
American Samoa-0.53%-3.98%
Croatia-0.62%-5.98%
Bulgaria-0.64%-5.53%
Bosnia and Herzegovina-0.72%-6.81%
Romania-0.72%-5.64%
Georgia-1.06%-8.89%
Puerto Rico-1.09%-9.83%
Northern Mariana Islands-1.12%-7.54%
Latvia-1.23%-10.90%
Lithuania-1.29%-11.11%

The table shows the growth or demographic decline in 147 countries in the years 2007 to 2016. By far the strongest growth was in Qatar, averaging 9.89% per year. This corresponds to a doubling of the population in less than 8 years. Overall, it is striking that these extremely high growth rates occur more frequently in small states of the Middle East and are associated with an above-average birth rate and an low mortality rate. The explanation for this lies in the very small proportion of older population strata. Older residents from 55 years are virtually non-existent and by far the largest population is between 25 and 54 years old.

Another cluster of states with increased population growth occurs in Central and South Africa. The reason is the exceptionally high birth rate, which is sometimes over 50‰ (=50 births per 1000 inhabitants and year). Worldwide, the average birth rate since the turn of the millennium is around 22‰. In addition, over the past 20 years there has been a noticeable decline in the mortality rate from around 20‰ to around 10‰ in these countries.

The opposite is clear at the other end of the table, where there are disproportionately many Eastern European countries. The death rate in these countries has been higher than the birth rate in recent decades. Also in this region, churn plays a greater role than e.g. in Western European or Asian countries.



Click on one of the country names in the table to see more information about each country.





Population growth worldwide

In the last 2000 years, the population almost continuously increased slowly and steadily. Just 350 years ago, there were only half a billion people on earth. With the "Industrial Revolution", at the end of the 18th century, an unprecedented increase in population began. Numerous technical and chemical developments such as e.g. medicine or fertilizer dropped the death rate drastically. At the same time, there was an improved supply of food for large parts of the population, which also ensured the future of the offspring and thus led to an increased birth rate. Population growth jumped from 0.3% up to 0.8%. In the following 300 years alone, the world population grew from 0.5 to over 3 billion people.

Considering the recent time, the curve flattens off again. The following graph shows the evolution of the world population from 1960 to 2016. The exponential development of the population has subsided and the graph is almost linear. There is only a minimal decline in growth rates.

At the end of 2016, there were 7.44 billion people on earth. The growth rate has been at 1.18 percent.


(Figures in billions of inhabitants)